National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse

National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse

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NAASCA Highlights
- Feature Articles -
EDITOR'S NOTE: Here are a few recent stories and feature articles from a variety of sources that are related to the kinds of issues we cover on our web site. They'll represent a small percentage of the information available to us, the public, as we fight to provide meaningful recovery services and help for those who've suffered child abuse. We'll add to and update this page regularly, bringing you just a few of the featured articles on the web site.
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Feature Story Archives - 2018
presentations from a variety of sources on
issues of child abuse and trauma
 
Archives from other years:
2011 - 2012 - 2013 - 2014
2015
- 2016 - 2017 - 2018

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Cynthia Lackner, MA
Emotional Brain Training
  I Give People Hope
Emotional Brain Training (EBT)

by Cynthia Lackner, MA
Certified Emotional Brain Training Provider - Stress Free Living

EDITOR'S NOTE: Cynthia Lackner, MA, offered to write an article about some of the issues and tools we'd discussed on her recent appearance as a 'special guest' on NAASCA's "Stop Child Abuse Now" talk radio show. Here it is !!

I am a psychotherapist in private practice. I work with people who were abused as children, domestic abuse victims, and others who struggle with debilitating depression, trauma and anxiety.

I often see victims who do not want to feel their emotions, so they turn to alcohol, pot, spending, gambling, porn and food; to self-soothe. These victims live with tremendous levels of stress.

I teach people how to self-regulate their stress by learning how to rewire their emotional brain, when triggered with stress throughout the day. Every thought, emotion, and behavior are the activation of a string of neurons.

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  Lost .. confused .. need direction?
132 of the Best Questions to Help You Reflect on Your Purpose


by Bill Murray

The other night one of the participants on one of our OPEN MIKE discussion "Stop Child Abuse Now" talk radio shows expressed a desire to have a more defined path for her life.

I wasn't surprised at all, as may of us find it difficult to decide what path we should take as we heal and grow stronger. It's as if we're lost, having never been given any clear direction about how to pursue a career, a place to live or what we want from our relationships.

Here's a terrific tool we found that's generated by the Rockwood Leadership Institute. It's an easy to use and understand exercise, featuring '132 of the Best Questions to Help You Reflect on your Purpose'.

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  How to Talk with Your Children about Sexual Abuse

by David Pittman, Together We Heal

I was once given some advice from a person much older and wiser than myself: “ If a child is old enough to ask the question, they are old enough to get the truth.” There is, however, a way to present truth in a way that neither scares the child nor impedes their ability to openly communicate with the adult about “delicate” subject matter.

The following is a combined list of different suggestions on ways to talk to your children about sexual abuse.

The sources for this information are Together We Heal, The Joyful Child Foundation, The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, FamilyWatchDog.com, The Center for Behavioral Intervention in Beaverton, Oregon, and the Colorado Bureau of Investigation's: Convicted Sex Offender Web Site, BACHNET, Child Lures, Inc., as well as my own personal recommendations based on personal experience.

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Dr Laura McGuire
  It's April, and I Invite All Survivors to the Spring
But healing, like growing, takes time and patience

by Dr Laura McGuire

EDITOR'S NOTE: We're delighted to present Dr Laura McGuire, a NAASCA family member who recently made the first of what we hope will be many appearances on our "Stop Child Abuse Now" talk radio shows. A sexologist, she's also offered to write occasional articles for our web site on the topic of child abuse and trauma.

April is a very special month for myself and my community. Spring has arrived, the world is blossoming and reminding us that life will always renew itself.

For many, this celebration is matched with Easter celebrations as well as two of the most important awareness months- Child Abuse and Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention. I do not think it is in anyway a coincidence that the world is being refreshed and renewed at the same time as we take a moment to pause, discuss, and highlight such dark and painful topics.

The famous young adult author, Madeleine L'Engle, once said, “The great thing about getting older is you don't lose all the other ages you have been.” The sentiment behind this is beautiful, that we keep the joy and innocence along with all our gained wisdom throughout each chapter of our lives. This can, however, be equally a painful sentiment for survivors.

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Misty Livingston   Why Disclose Child Abuse That Happened to You When You are Now an Adult?

by Misty Livingston, writer for NAASCA (National Association of Adult Survivors of Child Abuse)

I am writing this after discussions with several other survivors of child abuse this past week that have given me much food for thought about disclosure. If you don't know what I mean by disclosure, it is deciding who to let know about the abuse you have experienced in your life. This issue is a very personal one and significant to my life right now as I have decided in the last six months to break the silence about the history of child abuse in my family. If you care to read ahead, I appreciate your thoughts and feedback because I know I am not alone.

Today another survivor had shared something they had learned a hard lesson about in a 12 step program concerning disclosure: "don't go to a hardware store for a loaf of bread." Meaning don't expect normal and healthy reactions from people who are part of your toxic / dysfunctional family. So if we are seeking healing in our lives, then we must first realize we cannot get our “nourishment” (or bread) from people who are tools of the abusers!

My step-Dad became a devout Christian scholar while I was in my early teens and continued to share things with me in the role of "teacher" and "spiritual leader of our family" before he passed away in 2011. This made me remember one of the lessons my Dad would mention to me now and again:
"Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they may trample them under their feet, and turn and tear you to pieces." -- (Matthew 7:6 NIV)
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Lorna Littner, LMSW, M.S.
Human Sexuality Educator
  Seize The Day
Time to illuminate the issue of child sexual abuse

by Lorna Littner, LMSW, M.S.

Now that sexual impropriety in the workplace has caught and held the attention of the nation, isn't it time we broaden the media spotlight to also illuminate the issue of child sexual abuse? We are in a watershed moment where we are talking, reading, and maybe even disclosing our own experiences with sexual harassment and assault.

The question is: are we now ready, willing and able to use this moment and this platform to confront the issue of child sexual abuse as well?

Large numbers of children are at risk every day in places that are presumed to provide solace, service and a safe haven for them. While accurate statistics are very difficult to determine (because they are based only on reported cases and then inferred) the estimates of children who have been inappropriately and prematurely sexualized by an older person range from one in three to one in seven girls and one in six to one in 10 boys. That translates into roughly seven million children in the United States alone.

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  What's the difference between sexual abuse, sexual assault, sexual harassment and rape?

by Sarah L. Cook, Lilia M. Cortina and Mary P. Koss

The terms “sexual abuse,” “sexual assault,” “sexual harassment” – and even “rape” – crop up daily in the news. We are likely to see these terms more as the #MeToo movement continues.

Many people want to understand these behaviors and work to prevent them. It helps if we are consistent and as precise as possible when we use these terms.

But what does each term mean?

We are three scholars who have specialized in the scientific study of sexual abuse, rape, sexual assault and sexual harassment over several decades.

Let's start by defining each of these terms. Then, we can look at how these behaviors sometimes overlap.

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  25 Signs of Emotional Abuse

You need to learn how to identify abusive conduct, take a strong stand against it and acquire the necessary skills to protect yourself from future abuse

by Sinta Ebersohn

Sometimes, emotional abuse can be so subtle that we don't even realize we're being emotionally and mentally abused by someone's words or actions. Even though there are no visible bruises, the damage should never be underestimated.

How can it be abuse if it is so subtle? This kind of conduct systematically undermines your dignity and leaves you utterly vulnerable and defenceless. Being bullied by a person close to you whom you trust and love dearly, is probably one of the most difficult things to make sense of and can erode one's self-esteem to a life-threatening extent. Abuse does not only happen between couples – parents abuse children, children abuse their parents and it is common among scholars, siblings, friends and colleagues.

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HOME PAGE
programs / projects
RECOVERY
together we can heal
RESOURCES
help stop child abuse
ABOUT
a little about us
CONTACT
join us, get involved